Problem Solving for Tree Frogs

Tree Frog
These beautiful candleholders were purchased many years ago in Sanibel Island, Florida. Unfortunately, there’s a hidden problem, and it’s not the tree frogs.

Candleholders Before
Thick layers of tropical leaves weave their way around the base with three colorful tree frogs crawling among the foliage. Can you spot the problem? If you think it’s the candles, you’re right!

Closeup Top Candleholder
As you can see from this photo, the glass top of each candleholder will only fit a votive size candle. Proportionally, they would look much better with tall slim candles but they just won’t fit. We’re going to change that! The same procedure can be followed for any candleholders you may have. Let’s get started!

Supplies:
Candleholder Supplies
Supplies:
2) Candleholders
6) 12” Navy taper candles
Cardstock (See Crafting Tip in Step 1 for alternatives)
Gluestick
Scissors (or an X-Acto knife)
Fillet glove (optional protection when cutting)
Circle template
2) Rubber bands
Crinkle Paper (or mini glass marbles)

Additional Supplies:
Candleholder Paints
Painting Supplies:
Acrylic Paint – brown
Bottles of fabric paint – brown, dark green, yellow, medium green
Paintbrush

Creating Candleholder Caps
Cardstock Circles & Glue
Step 1 – To accommodate slimmer candles, we need to create a cap for the top of each candleholder. Measure the top of the candleholder. If you are using cardstock, cut 3) small 2-1/2” circles, and 2) large 3” circles. Glue the small circles together, one on top of the other like a layer cake. Glue the two large circles together in the same fashion. Center the small circles on top of the large and glue them together. Repeat this step to make the cap for the second candleholder.

Crafter Tip: This project was completed during the Covid 19 lockdown. I had to work with what I had on hand. In hindsight, I believe caps made from matt board or a sheet of plastic would be more rigid, and would only require cutting out two circles, one for each candleholder.

Tracing the Candles
Trace Candles
Step 2 – I decided to use three 12” tall taper candles in each candleholder. Hold the three candles in the center of each cap and trace the shape with a pen or pencil. Cut out the center of each cap following the triad shape of the candles.

Finished Caps
Assembled Cardstock Caps
You now have two caps for the candleholders. Test each to ensure a good fit on the candleholders. Test-fit the candles for a snug fit in each cap. Make adjustments by trimming as needed. Because the taper candles vary in size, be sure to label the bottom of each cap with “L” for left and “R” for right to ensure the candles will fit in a later step.

Painted Base Coat & Glass Marbles
Cardstock Caps Painted Brown
Step 3 – Paint the tops and edges of the caps brown to blend with the branches in the base. You may need to add mini glass marbles or crinkle paper to the bottoms to adjust the candles to the desired height.

Candles in Caps
Banded Taper Candles
Step 4 – Slide the candles into the cap. Adjust the cap’s position as needed. Wrap the candles with a rubber band beneath the cap to secure their positioning.

Final Candle Placement
Fitting Tapers in Candleholders
Step 5 – Place the candles and cap into the top of the holder. Temporarily slide the cap up to fill the void with marbles or crinkle paper. This will stabilize the candles in an upright position. To ensure that the caps will stay in place, I tacked three spots along the edge of each cap with hot glue.

Crafter Tip: I found that the crinkle paper provided firmer support than the glass marbles, which have a tendency to shift.

First Layer of Leaves
1st Layer Leaves
Step 6 – Create 3-dimensional leaves on top with fabric paint in colors similar to those found in the base.

Second Layer of Leaves
2nd Layer Leaves
Step 7 – Allow drying time. Add another layer of leaves overlapping the previous one.

Fourth Layer of Leaves
4th Layer Leaves
Step 8 – Allow drying time between layers. Add as many layers as you like to build up thick foliage.

Finished Candleholders
Completed Candleholders
These are the completed candleholders with their new candles.

Candleholders – Before & After
Before & After Frog Candle Holders
Note how much better they look with the taller candles. The blue candles and new three-dimensional painted green and yellow leaves accentuate the rainforest colors in the frogs and foliage.

When you can’t find the candles you need, it’s time to flex your creativity muscles. If you have had a similar creative challenge, please share your experiences in the comments section.

Thanks for reading & Happy Crafting!

Celebrating 100th Post

100th Post
Today marks a very important milestone – my 100th post! It has been a wonderful experience, and I thank all my readers and followers for taking this journey with me. Below are photos and links to each category of arts and crafts covered to date. Please take a few minutes to peruse your favorites.

Baking & Candy Making
Baking & Candy Making

Beaded Jewelry & Gemstones
Beaded Jewelry & Gemstones

Color Theory
Color Theory

Floral & Home Decor
Floral & Home Decor

“How To” Projects
How-to Projects

Inspiration
Inspiration

Miscellaneous Crafts
Miscellaneous Crafts

Painting – Decorative Techniques
Decorative Painting

Seasons & Holidays
Seasons & Holidays

Wood Crafts
Wood Crafts

Please let me know, in the comments section, if you have any suggestions for future arts and crafts topics. I am looking forward to the next 100 posts. This achievement would not be possible without all of you! Thank you!!

Thanks for reading & Happy Crafting!

Trompe l’oeil – Painting Not Politics

Ruby Slippers & Yellow Brick Rd
In “The Wizard of Oz,” Judy Garland and friends danced their way along the yellow brick road. The next time you watch the movie, take a closer look at the scene when Dorothy meets the Scarecrow. You can see a line across the yellow bricks on the road to the left. This marks the bottom edge of a very large canvas, suspended from the ceiling, which provides the illusion that the road winds through the countryside and beyond. You may not know the terminology, but that is a perfect example of trompe l’oeil.

Polka Dot Eggs
Polka Dot Eggs
Translated into English as “fool the eye,” trompe l’oeil is an art technique used to create three-dimensional illusions. In order to fool the eye, the artist must excel at utilizing perspective, light and shadow, color, and scale. Each of these aspects lends another layer in a composition created solely to entertain and challenge human perception. In the above photo, I’m sure many pedestrians walk around the “protruding” polka dot eggs for fear of walking into one, but it’s actually a cleverly painted illusion.

Mountain Path
Mountain Path
The arched niche in this photograph is real, but the stone path, lavender flowers and mountain vista are painted illusions. Notice how well the path aligns with the opening of the arch, inviting you to begin an awesome hike through a beautiful landscape. The mist and snow covered peaks lend a chill to the air in this amazingly realistic scene.

Fluttering Fabric
Trompe l'oeil Facade Toronto
We’ve all seen window curtains fluttering in the breeze. This building appears to have the “curtains” on the exterior, held in place by four tacks. Including the windows and architectural details, none of it is real.

Waterfall Bridge
Waterfall Bridge
While some illusions evoke wonder and awe with their fanciful, storybook qualities, others tend to be appreciated from afar due to a projected sense of danger, particularly in regard to depth perception. Probably the most disorienting 3D illusions are located upon the floor. When you see what appears to be a gaping hole in the ground, you’re going to walk or ride around it. Notice the people in this photo are walking along the perimeter of the bridge, not down the center. Interestingly, the black dog in the background is not fooled by the illusion. Maybe dogs have a different way of sensing depth than we do. The water appears to pour in from both sides to become beautiful waterfalls plunging into a deep gorge below. Painted to resemble rushing blue water, a portion of the left side railing nearly disappears. It’s a shame the painted water doesn’t match the green color of the existing river to complete the illusion.

Town with a View
Town & Landscape
A first glance, it’s easy to see that the canyon view within the archway is a painting. However, everything you see, with the exception of the brown-framed window, is an illusion. The wooden bench, the sidewalk and even the trash can look real. I wonder how many people walk toward that bench to rest?

Old Fashioned Storefront
Old Fashioned Storefront
The proprietor of this store stands ready to serve his customers, while his wife sits nearby people watching. Epicerie is the French word for grocery store. This family-run business showcases fresh produce and vegetables in front of the store and upon shelves inside the store windows. The stacked merchandise, cast shadows, and event poster upon the wall add realistic touches to this beautiful artwork. It was clever of the artist to use the words on the store windows to advertise his or her painting business. Perhaps that is why they chose not to show reflections on the glass.

Charming Italian Restaurant
Restaurant
Romance meets fairy tales in the lovely formal gardens adorning the second floor of this popular Italian restaurant. White flowers follow the railing as if they are growing alongside the staircase. The open door at the top of the stairs teases the viewer to step “outside” to walk along the beautifully landscaped paths. The only downside to this mural is the unfortunate location of the air conditioning vents near the ceiling, which detract from the grand garden illusion.

Flower Boxes
Flowers
Petals and leaves appear to spill over a low wall from this imaginary window box. As with the previous photo, the vent locations are unfortunate, but in this case the artist has camouflaged them well.

Ornate Window Frame
Ornate Window Frame
Artisans, who trained a lifetime perfecting their crafts, constructed old world architecture. This simple wood framed window exudes that same Old World charm “sculpted” in paint. The ornate details, use of light and shadow successfully combine to give this window frame depth and a richness found only in some of the most prized buildings in Europe.

Deep Sea Diver
Deep Sea Diver
Treasure hunting on a pirate shipwreck in an underwater mine field is not for the faint of heart. This diver appears to have been successful in his search, but he’s not the only one interested. The 3D rendering has effectively created the illusion that the diver’s upper body leans out beyond the wall. The gold necklace is so real you could almost take it from his hand. An octopus tentacle reaches into the painting from our side in the real world – Yikes!

Architectural Details
Libreria Piccolomini Italy
The faux architectural details, such as the coffered ceiling, archways, and the ornate building in the background, visually expand the space.

Candlelit Bridge
Candlelit Bridge
It appears a section of this ultra contemporary bridge has collapsed, revealing an ancient chamber hidden below. This moody, mysterious scene is reminiscent of a Harry Potter film. As we peer into this strange stone-lined room, we are met with the vision of sands in an hourglass, which appear to have stopped flowing, and a burning candle, resting atop a pedestal. Wax drips down the sides and the flame flickers above the walkway surface. What other secrets lie hidden in the darkness? Should we dare to find out, or turn and run? I’m guessing most people would find another way to get to the other side.

Hailing a Taxi Cab
Hailing a Taxi Cab
What a phenomenal painting! The artist has an impressive grasp of perspective and the effects of light. Check out the shadows cast upon the brick wall by the man, the car, and the signpost. Nothing has been overlooked. Even the single orange balloon and string cast a shadow. A floating car would be a very cool way to travel with virtually no traffic. Descending could be problematic. I wonder if they give frequent flyer miles?

Trumpet Player
Trumpet Player
Let’s end on a high note! (lol) I think it’s safe to say that the trumpet in this amazing painting is a tripping hazard. It really looks as if it’s sticking right out of that wall. The only way to improve this illusion would be the relocation of the central air conditioning unit around the corner away from the painting.

Artwork tells a story in a universal language we can all understand. It evokes our emotions and challenges our senses. The next time you find yourself sidestepping around an optical illusion, remember you are as much a part of the artist’s composition as the paint itself.

Thanks for reading & Happy Crafting!

Crafting Day & Night

Eiffel Tower Day & Night

“As different as day and night” is a common expression. As we find our selves stuck inside, we’re often looking for ways to be entertained. For many, crafting is the answer. A little effort goes a long way, and everyone loves seeing “Before” and “After” photos. These crafts will surprise and hopefully inspire you to create a little crafting magic of your own.

Sledding Centerpiece

Before:  Wooden Sled Wall Art.   After:  Snowman & Friends Centerpiece.
(Click here for how to instructions)

Foxy Santa

Before:  Misfit Christmas Decoration.   After:  Foxy Santa with new hat and tail.
(Click here for how to instructions)

Seashell Plaque

Before:  Drab Wall Art Print.   After:  Seashells, Sea Urchin & Starfish Framed Art.
(Click here for how to instructions)

Piggy Before and After

Before:  Colorless Pig Statue.   After:  Pink Pig with lots of personality.
(Click here for how to instructions)

Before & After Pumpkins

Before:  Faded Lawn Decoration.   After:  Bold Halloween Jack-O-Lanterns
(Click here for how to instructions)

Headless Dog Before & After

Before:  Snowman with Headless Dog.   After:  Restored Dog.
(Click here for how to instructions)

Light House Before & After

Before:  Incomplete Candleholder.   After:  New Lighthouse Roof & “Light.”
(Click here for how to instructions)

Octopus Before & After

Before:  Monochromatic Candleholder.   After:  Blue Ringed Octopus Sculpture.
(Click here for how to instructions)

Sneak Peak of Upcoming Projects:

Candlestick Before & After

Before:  Difficult Candle Size.   After:  Candleholder for Taper Candles.
(Stay tuned for how to instructions in a future post)

Leaves Before & After

Before:  Dull, “Muddy” Wall Sconces.   After:  Vibrant Tropical Leaves & Candles.
(Stay tuned for how to instructions in a future post)

I hope you enjoyed these projects. Take a look around your home for any items that could use a little refreshing. You’ll be amazed at what you can accomplish. Good Luck!

Thanks for reading & Happy Crafting!

This Little Piggy Gets a Makeover

Flying Pig
We’ve all heard the expression, “when pigs fly,” implying impossibility. Well, the craft stores may be closed, but we won’t let that stop us from expressing our creativity!

Flying Pig Front
Sometimes you find your next art project in the most unlikely of places! I found this cute little winged pig at the local Rite Aid Pharmacy! Although it’s fine the way it is, I thought it would be nice to add some color. Break out your brushes and acrylic paints because we’re going to give this little piggy a makeover! In my excitement to get started, I had already painted the eyes when I realized I hadn’t taken a “Before” photo. In its original state, there was no color at all.

Flying Pig Back
Here’s a photo of the back. The wings are so cute.

Piglet
Before we get started, I found a photo of this piglet for inspiration. Please feel free to choose any colors you like. The mix of colors on the spotted pig featured at the top of this post would make a great color scheme as well.

Piggy Paints
To complete this project, you will need several acrylic paints and two paint brushes (1 large & 1 small). Clear spray paint is optional.

Painted Pig Details
Paint the details first, including the hooves, eyes, tongue, and the inside of each ear.

Closeup Facial Details
Here is a close up of his smiling little face. The eyes are painted brown, with black pupils and a dot of white in each eye to create a lively expression.

Pink Pig Front
Because the black hooves seemed to be too much contrast, I changed the color of the hooves to tan. In doing so, the eyes become the focal point. Mix white and fuchsia together to create the desired shade of pink, and use it to paint the entire body, except for the end of the snout, which is unpainted.

Pink Pig Back
Here is the back photo. The wings are also unpainted. If you like a challenge, you could come up with a unique scheme for the feathers, possibly using iridescent colors. To protect the acrylic paints, the entire statue was sprayed with clear spray paint.

Piggy Before and After
Before                                                             After

This fun and easy project is inexpensive and can be completed in a very short amount of time. All drug stores have a seasonal section, which is marked down after every holiday and at season’s end by as much as 50% -75% off. There are some great options for adults as well as kids.

Thanks for reading! Happy Crafts!

A Crafter’s Nightmare Before Christmas

Snowman Detail
It may seem like an odd time to be talking about Christmas, but stay with me because this funny story could happen to anyone regardless of the time of year. Did you ever buy something without noticing a major flaw? I did, and it actually took a few days to notice. I purchased several wintry figurines for use in a Christmas centerpiece. There was a cardinal, a penguin, and an adorable polar bear. I also chose a cute figure of a boy building a snowman, which resembled one of those warm family scenes in a Norman Rockwell painting.

Original Headless Dog
I set up the sleigh centerpiece and surrounded it with the new figures. There it sat in our family room for a few days. Occasionally I would look at it, but didn’t notice anything amiss. Then one night, while watching television, I picked up one of the figures for a closer look. There appeared to be a snow-covered object leaning against the base of the snowman. What could it be? Maybe it was a tree stump or a rock?

Close Up Headless Dog
Curiosity got the best of me. I held it under a lamp and was shocked by my discovery! It was a headless dog! Unless you happen to be Tim Burton, a headless dog is a little too macabre for such a festive season. The store where I purchased it was closing, and all sales were final. Maybe I could fix it myself, but how? I considered breaking off the rest of it, but that would most likely damage the snowman. I began wondering if I could create a new head using three-dimensional paint.

Headless Dog Painted Brown
Because the white dog was leaning against a white snowman, it was very difficult to see. To correct that problem, the first step was painting the dog’s body with acrylic brown paint. What a big improvement! He was actually a cute little dog if you overlooked the missing head!

New Dog Head
Next, using white three-dimensional paint, I built up a small head in proportion to the body. Because the dog was looking up at the snowman, the head needed to be angled upward. After allowing it to dry, I added the muzzle and the pointed ears with the same dimensional white paint.

Finished Dog
The last step was painting the new head with brown acrylic paint to match the body, and a toothpick was used to add black eyes and a nose. The completed dog looked pretty happy to be in one piece again!


The repaired snowman figurine had been restored to a Rockwell worthy appearance. Sorry, Tim, maybe next year – lol!

Did something like this ever happen to you? How did you fix it? Please share your experiences in the comments section.

Thanks for reading and Happy Crafting!

Pineapple Dreams

Pineapple Beach
I’m sure we are all dreaming of fun in the sun, days at the beach, and the freedom to go wherever we choose. Until then, we can find ways to bring a little sunshine into our homes and maybe a smile or two along the way. This week’s project is a painted wooden pineapple. As usual, we’ll need a little inspiration courtesy of Mother Nature.

Pineapple Colors
It’s amazing how many colors can be found in the outer skin of a pineapple.

Pineapple Texture
The complex textures and geometric patterns are beautiful.

Golden Pineapple
Pineapples have long been a symbol for hospitality. What could be a better way to greet everyone to your home than displaying a bright welcoming pineapple?

How to Paint a Textured Wooden Pineapple:
Pineapple CloseUp
Pineapple has such wonderful texture that needs to be touched. By using fabric paints, you can create thick, 3-D effects with very little effort.

Raw Wood Pineapple
Raw Wood Pineapple
Thick wood has been cut out in the shape of a pineapple and has the advantage of strong, rectangular base. Both sides and all the edges will need to be painted. Due to the raw nature of the wood, it may require a little sanding, especially along the edges.

Supplies
Pineapple Supplies
Supplies:
Wooden Pineapple (11-3/8” high x 5” wide x 1/2” thick) (Base is 5” wide x 2” deep)
Acrylic Paints – brown, yellow, green, tan
5) Bottles Fabric Paint – dark green, yellow, white (not shown)
Paintbrushes
Sandpaper
Black Sharpie Marker or pencil

Paint Base Colors
Pineapple Ptd Base Colors
Using acrylic paints and a brush, paint the leaves green, the remainder of the pineapple yellow and the base brown.

Define the Leaves
Draw Pineapple Leaf Details
Draw the leaf details with a Sharpie marker or pencil.

Texture the Leaves
Pineapple 3D Leaves
Trace the leaves with green fabric paint, including the perimeter edges. Allow the paint to dry overnight. Depending upon how thick you want the texture to be, it may require a second coat.

Texture the Pineapple
Pineapple Texture1
Starting at the base of the leaves, paint two horizontal rows of irregularly shaped rectangles with yellow fabric paint.

Directional Texture
Pineapple Texture2
Continue painting the yellow texture, working on a diagonal as shown. I started in the upper right corner and staggered the shapes, which get larger as you work toward the bottom.

Completed Yellow Texture
Pineapple Completed Texture
This photo shows the completed yellow texture. Allow it to dry overnight. If you accidentally get yellow paint on the brown base, simply touch up the paint as needed. It’s now ready for a few finishing touches.

Little Details
Pineapple Texture Detail
To complete the look, make a dot in the center of each yellow “block” and create an upward stroke of paint, which narrows to a point. Repeat this step across the entire yellow pineapple surface. Allow drying time. For the last step, use a tiny brush to apply tan acrylic paint to the tip of each white point.

Finished Pineapple
Pineapple Finshing Details
This completes the textured pineapple project. I hope you enjoyed it.

Have you painted any wooden home décor items? Do you have any secrets to creating texture? Please share your ideas in the comments section.

Thanks for reading!

Happy Crafting!

At the Crossroads – Wall Art

Many people think the symbolic cross originated in Christianity, but the cross has been used for centuries by many ancient cultures, including the Egyptians and Babylonians.

Ancient Egyptian Ankh
Ancient Egyptian Ankh
In ancient Egypt, the ankh represented “Life.”

Compass on Ancient Maps
Compass
Crosses have been found in prehistoric cave paintings, most likely indicating astronomical events as well as the cardinal directions, much like the compass shown on the map above.

Crosses can be found in very diverse places, such as cemeteries, churches, clothing, and even jewelry. Before designing a cross, let’s take a look at a few more examples:

Greek Cross
Greek Cross
The ancient Greek cross had equal length arms and resembled the letter “X,” while the more modern version has the typical upright design and the addition of three lobes at each end.

Celtic Cross
Celtic Cross
The cross tombstone in the photo above illustrates the intricately woven knots, which are an integral part of every Celtic design.

Ornate Sterling Silver & Turquoise Cross
Silver Turquoise Cross
Silver or gold, jewel encrusted crosses reflect light and dazzle the eye with ornate patterns and precious gemstones of all kinds.

Contemporary Stained Glass Cross
Stained Glass Contemporary Cross
Brilliant stained glass in a kaleidoscope pattern twinkles in the sunlight in this very contemporary window.

Maltese Cross
Maltese Cross
The Maltese cross has four V-shaped arms. It has a more subtle cross design, which in this case could be easily mistaken for a flower.

How to Design Painted Wood Crosses:
Three Painted Crosses
Instructions for 3) designs are presented below: Celtic, Jeweled Gold, and Jeweled Silver.

Raw Wood Cross
Raw Wood Cross
Each raw wood cross is sanded lightly, as needed. The supplies needed vary according to the design chosen. If you happen to have colored pencils or markers on hand, you might want to trace the cross onto sheets of paper and color a few samples to help narrow down your design choices.

Supplies
Supplies
Supplies:
Wooden Cross (8-1/4” high x 5-3/4” wide x 1/4” thick)
Acrylic Paints – black, metallic gold, metallic silver
5) Bottles Fabric Paint – dark green, medium green, blue, purple, & metallic gold
1) Package – 12mm round Jewel Tone Rhinestones
1) Package – 12mm round Pastel Rhinestones
1) Package – Clear Diamond-shaped Rhinestones
Paintbrushes
Sandpaper

Cross Painted Black
Cross with 2 Coats Black Paint
Each cross design in this project starts the same way, by applying 2 coats of acrylic black paint as a basecoat.

The Celtic Cross:
Celtic Knots & Infinity Symbols
Paint the perimeter details using medium green fabric paint for a 3-dimensional effect. Single lines and infinity symbols make up this pattern.

Celtic Cross Inner Details
Using the same fabric paint, paint the inner details including woven chains, and a large Celtic knot design in the center. Create pairs of large round “beads” of paint at each end (top, bottom, left and right).

Celtic Gold Accents Finished Cross
For a more 3-dimensional effect, carefully apply a second coat of fabric paint. After it has dried, add the gold details using metallic gold fabric paint.  This completes the Celtic Cross design.

Gold Jeweled Cross:
Painted Gold Accents
Your first decision is how much gold versus black you want to have in the design. Using metallic gold acrylic paint and a brush, I created a starburst at the center, which radiates outward to the ends. A studded detail was created using metallic gold fabric paint.

Gold Cross Jewel Layout
Experiment with different colors and placement of the rhinestones. Do not glue them down until a later step. After seeing this, I decided to increase the gold areas for a more opulent appearance and because the blue “sapphires” look better against the gold.

Gold Cross Enhanced Accents
Here you can see how the gold has been enhanced, leaving only a few key areas black. All the inside and outside edges have also been painted gold.

Gold Cross Jeweled Option 1
In this version, three colors of rhinestones, blue, green, and yellow, have been used.

Gold Cross Jeweled Option 2
Here the rhinestone colors were limited to blue and green.

Gold Cross Jeweled Option 3
This is the finished version with blue and yellow rhinestones. The deep yellow coordinates well with the rich metallic gold. Use Elmer’s glue to affix the gems. This completes the Gold Jeweled Cross Design.

Silver Jeweled Cross:
Silver Pastel Jeweled Cross
I had pastels in mind for this cross. I started out by testing different combinations of pastel colored rhinestones. I liked the light blue and purple with the green center.

Pastel Silver Accents
Metallic silver and black make a powerful combination with maximum contrast and reflectance. The rhinestone colors were carried into an alternating painted “gem” pattern created using dark green, blue and purple fabric paint in gemstone shapes.

Pastel Silver Enhanced Accents
The remaining inner portions, including the edges, are painted with acrylic metallic silver paint. Layout the rhinestones, but do not glue them down until a later step. Clear “diamond” rhinestones are glued in the center along with one round blue stone.

Pastel Silver Stripes Part 1
It felt like a little more silver was needed. I painted stripes at each end of the cross and then added more stripes along the outer edges.

Pastel Silver Stripes Part 2
Feeling good about the design, more stripes were added throughout the design. I have never been a big fan of stripes, so I’m not sure why I did this. The nice thing about paint is that you can easily change your mind and simply repaint.

Silver Pastel Jeweled Cross Finished
It took 2 coats of black to cover the stripes. Metallic silver was painted at the ends, and only those edges were painted silver, while the remainder was black. This completes the Silver Jeweled Cross design.

Finished Cross Designs:
Finished Crosses
Each of these crosses has its own unique style, but they barely touch the surface of design possibilities. Take a trip to the craft store to see what kinds of decorations appeal to you as well as the different styles of wood crosses available. In fact, you might have so much fun making the first one that you’ll have to go back to buy more.

Happy Easter & Happy Crafting!

The Bunny Hop – Painted Wooden Rabbit

Before we begin this Easter-themed project, we’ll need a little inspiration. Let’s take a look at a few of Mother Nature’s color scheme choices in the adorable bunny photos below:

Tan Baby Bunny
Baby bunnies are just so cute! That’s a lot of love wrapped in a soft tan and cream coat.

Gray & White Bunny
This stylish rabbit is modeling the very popular gray and white color combo.

Tan & Brown Bunny
Wild rabbits often have a blended fur coat of brown, tan and black to help camouflage them from predators. The one pictured above looks perfectly content to nap where he is without a care in the world.

Black & White Bunny
Last but not least is this precious black and white baby. His delicate features, including his button nose, inner ears and the outline of his eyes, are a soft pink.

Now that we’ve seen a few ideas, let’s get started painting!

How to Paint a Wooden Rabbit:

Raw Wood Bunny
Thick wood has been cut out in the shape of a rabbit and has the advantage of strong, rectangular base. Both sides and all the edges will need to be painted. Due to the raw nature of the wood, it may require a little sanding, especially along the edges.

Bunny Supplies
Supplies:
Wooden Rabbit (17” high x 8” wide x 1/4” thick) (Base is 5-3/4” wide x 4”deep)
Acrylic Paints – brown, black, gray, tan, green & white
Fan paintbrush, small detail paintbrush and thicker brush for base coats
Sandpaper
Optional: Fabric paints – black, brown, white (Refer to Advanced section below)

Painted White Bunny
Step 1 – Paint the rabbit with 2) coats of white acrylic paint, including both sides and all edges.

Painted Back Bunny
Step 2 – Start painting the fur on the back. Experiment with colors and brush techniques. I poured black, brown and gray paint onto an artist’s palette. Dip a fan brush into each color and then apply to wood surface to create a fur-like effect. Because the paints have not been mixed, each new brush stroke will have a slightly different combination of colors, just like real fur. Repeat thus process until the back is completed. The white tail will be added later.

Layout Details Front Bunny
Step 3 – On the front, draw the face (eyes, eyelids, eyelashes, muzzle with nose, mouth, whiskers), ears and feet with a pencil. Paint the inside of the ears and eyelids tan.

Painted Front Bunny
Step 4 – Create the fur by repeating the procedures in Step 2. Be sure to make long brush strokes along the edges of the ears to resemble thick fur. You can leave the eyes, muzzle, and feet white for now. These areas will be detailed in the next step.

Bunny Closeup1
Step 5 – Paint the facial details. I painted the eyes, eyelashes, nose, mouth and whiskers black.

Bunny Closeup 2
Step 5A – This is an alternate version for the eyes and nose. A brown iris has been added to each eye, the eyelashes have been extended, and brown nostrils define the nose. For a more lively expression, don’t forget to put a dot of white in the pupil of each eye.

Finished Bunny
Step 6 – The finished rabbit has white feet with black lines to define the toes. The base was painted with two coats of green.

Finished Bunny Tail
Step 7 – Paint a big, white fluffy tail on the back.

At this point your project is finished and ready to display. If you would like to take this design to the next level, please follow the steps below.

Advanced Rabbit in 3D
Followers of this blog know how much I love creating 3D details on wood projects using fabric paints. If you appreciate three-dimensional effects, this section is for you! Unless otherwise noted, all paints listed below are dimensional fabric paints.

3D Bunny Face
Start by painting 2 thick coats of white fabric paint on the muzzle, and brown paint for the eyes.

3D Bunny Feet
Next paint the feet with 2 thick coats of white paint.

3D Face Details
To complete the face, use black paint for the nose, mouth, whiskers, eyelashes, and the outline around the eyes. Add a black pupil in each eye. Paint a white dot in the center of each pupil, and use brown paint in each nostril.

3D Body Details
Add long brown fur along the inner edges of both ears and define the two front legs using the same paint. Add the black lines to define the toes on each foot.

Detail Facial Fur
Using short strokes, bring the black and brown fur mixture up into the face.

Detail Legs and Feet
Layer additional black and brown fur to define the body, and add the two back feet.

Finished 3D Bunny Front
Because the rear legs are in the background, keep the paint lighter by using tiny strokes with just the brown paint in an upward direction. If you want additional fur texture, you could use acrylic paints and a brush to thicken the fur coat with highlights and lowlights.

Finished 3D Bunny Back
The last step is painting the tail with 3 coats of white fabric paint.

Mission accomplished! This cute little guy is ready to be displayed in your home, bringing joy to your life for years to come.

Happy Easter and Happy Crafting!

Luck of the Irish

St Patrick's Day BannerLeprechauns and a pot of gold are certainly hallmarks of St. Patrick’s Day. Below are a few crafting ideas to help you get ready for this upcoming celebration of all things Irish.

Shamrocks
Ireland, known as the Emerald Isle, is famous for its shamrocks. If you are lucky enough, you may even find a four-leaf clover. Notice the almost woven effect created by the natural layering of these leaves. Irish knot work patterns, such as the one illustrated below, are inspired by the natural world.

Carved Marble Knots
Eternity knots can be found on everything in Ireland. The pattern shown here has been carved into marble. It could also be carved or burnt into wood, stenciled onto a wall, or drawn and/or painted onto t-shirts, handbags, or even a comforter. Jewelry makers include knot designs for their beauty as well as the symbolism of eternal love.

Cookies & Irish Coffee
A great way to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day is with a few shamrock cookies and a creamy mug of Irish coffee. In case you didn’t know, this coffee gets its high-octane kick from a shot of Irish whiskey.

Irish Soda Bread
Store bought Irish soda bread is usually made ahead of time and may be too dry. It’s best enjoyed straight out of the oven.

Jewelry Charms
The four-leaf clover is a very popular good luck talisman. A leather cord is a very inexpensive way to make a necklace. The cord can be cut to the desired length, and special cord tips are attached to the ends along with a spring ring or lobster claw clasp. Any charms with a large enough bail can be slid onto the cord and easily changed for a new look. Prefer ready-made jewelry? Ready to wear cords can be purchased with the charms of your choice.

St. Paddy's Day Parade
Of course you’ll need to wear something green to really get into the spirit of the holiday. A little green fabric is all you need – a hat, scarf, socks – anything will do.

Irish Icons
These icons are often found on everything from mugs and T-shirts to bumper stickers. Iron-ons are inexpensive and easy to apply. Craft stores also have stickers, as well as temporary tattoos, which have all the cool designs without any of the commitment.

Irish Embroidery
Embroidery is a great way to dress up any garment with lively, eye-catching graphics and funny sayings.

Shamrocks Crochet
If crocheting were your specialty, these three leaf clovers would make a very unique scarf or hat. They could also be used as decorative accents on a pillow or afghan.

Beer & Shamrocks
There are plenty of colorful holiday-themed sheets in the papercrafting aisle, or you might want to design your own. If there’s a subliminal message in this design, I suppose it would be: “I love shamrocks and beer!” Who doesn’t? (lol)

Art Clay
Working with art clay can be a fun activity for the whole family. Figures like these pictured above could be used as jewelry pendants, or attached to hair accessories or refrigerator magnets, just to name a few.

Irish Angel Stained Glass
Stained glass is a beautiful way to incorporate holiday themes and of course the color green and requisite shamrock for luck.

Ceramic Irish Bear
Belleek, is a well-known brand of Irish pottery, recognized by its neutral cream color, which often includes hand painted shamrocks. You can achieve the same look, at a fraction of the price, by visiting a ceramics studio to paint your own using a similar color scheme.

Lucky Horseshoe
An up-turned horseshoe has always been considered good luck. The addition of a four-leaf clover may be all that’s needed to amplify good fortune to the next level. well, it’s certainly worth a try.

On St. Patrick’s Day, everybody is Irish! So wear something green, enjoy a pint, and keep an eye out for a rainbow – there might just be a pot of gold under it waiting to be discovered!

Happy St. Patrick’s Day and Happy Crafting!